Online Courses from Humanities Experts

Delivered to you, where and when you need, to impact your classroom.

Free

(SMR 22) Understanding The Modern Middle East

Study the oyster and its impact on history, industry, and society from a humanities lens. Discuss local experiences and connections to its roots in American culture.

Free

(SMR 22) The Where of Why: GIS in the Humanities Classroom

Free

(SMR 22) Medieval Africa and Africans

The course will contextualize Medieval Africa in terms of its contemporary relationships with the medieval globe as well as its modern impact.

Free

(SMR 22) Critical Media Literacy: Decoding Disinformation and Myths in the News

Explore digital literacy through a humanities lens. Discuss how online media has evolved, and how it can be brought to life in a classroom setting.

Free

(SMR 22) Women of the Americas: Early Encounters and Entangled Histories

The history of European discovery, contact, and early settlement in the Americas is traditionally represented as a chain of great men. Students and the wider public are often familiar with the lives of few women beyond Martha Washington, Betsy Ross, and now the Schuyler sisters. This course disrupts narratives that focus exclusively on the history of men by exploring the lives of European, Indigenous, and African-descended women during the sixteenth through early eighteenth centuries who were integral to the development of Spanish, Dutch, English, and French colonial societies in North America. By tracing the lives of Indigenous interpreters, enslaved laborers, and women who traversed the Atlantic and carved a place for themselves in colonial legal, social, and economic systems, this course demonstrates that the history of the Americas cannot be understood without examining the experiences of these women.

Free

(SMR 22) “My Piece of the American Pie”: Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Music

Explore digital literacy through a humanities lens. Discuss how online media has evolved, and how it can be brought to life in a classroom setting.

Free

(SMR 22) Empowering Maptivists: Using Maps & Data to Teach Social Justice Topics

The history of European discovery, contact, and early settlement in the Americas is traditionally represented as a chain of great men. Students and the wider public are often familiar with the lives of few women beyond Martha Washington, Betsy Ross, and now the Schuyler sisters. This course disrupts narratives that focus exclusively on the history of men by exploring the lives of European, Indigenous, and African-descended women during the sixteenth through early eighteenth centuries who were integral to the development of Spanish, Dutch, English, and French colonial societies in North America. By tracing the lives of Indigenous interpreters, enslaved laborers, and women who traversed the Atlantic and carved a place for themselves in colonial legal, social, and economic systems, this course demonstrates that the history of the Americas cannot be understood without examining the experiences of these women.

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